Urbanisation

The discussion series Global Debates took place in November and December 2015 in London to mark the 10th anniversary of Urban Age. The debates focused on the key themes of climate change, governance, infrastructure, economy and equity which have been the focus of Urban Age conferences, research and publications for the last 10 years.

After investigating 12 cities in four continents with over 200 million inhabitants, the Urban Age has established a deep understanding of how spatial, environmental and social dynamics are deeply interlinked in cities today. Our work has moved from the descriptive to the prescriptive, and we are engaged with decision-makers in global cities and institutions to help shape decisions that affect the way people live in an increasingly complex urban world.

Ricky Burdett, LSE Cities

Further Information

Contact

Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft
Unter den Linden 13/15
10117 Berlin

 

T. +49 (0)30 3407 3401
info.ahg@db.com

Partners & Publications

Global Debates was jointly organised by the Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft and LSE Cities in association with Guardian Cities to celebrate ten years of the Urban Age programme.

Guardian Cities articles:
25/11/2015 'Who runs our cities...' by R. Burdett, P. Rode and LSE team
24/11/2015 'Who owns the city...' by Saskia Sassen
23/11/2015 'Cities in numbers...' by LSE Cities
22/11/2015 ‘N.Foster: I have no power as an architect, none whatsoever’ by Rowan Moore
20/11/2015 'It's time to rethink the entire role and language of architecture' by Alejandro Aravena
17/11/2015 'Climate change and cities...' by Nicholas Stern and Dimitri Zenghelis
16/11/2015 'The urban ultimatum...' by Deyan Sudjic

Confronting Climate Change: can cities be the solution?

In the run-up to the Paris Climate Conference (COP21), the debate will highlight the fundamental role that cities can play in reducing global energy demand and limiting carbon emissions. It will challenge national and international decision-makers and institutions to recognise that action at the metropolitan level can have a direct impact on the health and environmental stability of the planet, as well as promoting green jobs and social equity.
Climate Change
Mexico City, Mexico, by Armin Linke
China and India’s footprints are expected to be six times larger in 2030 than in 2000, while many African cities are among the fastest growing, ushering in urbanisation to the world’s least urban continent. The World Bank has recently pledged up to $29bn in financial assistance to poorer nations to cope with climate change, but the challenge of how best to spend it remains.
Ricky Burdett LSE Cities

 Ricky Burdett, LSE Cities

The debate confronted some of the tough questions facing decision-makers – should climate change challenges be addressed through adaptation ( should we learn to live with water and flooding like the Dutch?) or mitigation (should we reduce greenhouse gas emissions by planning more connected and compact cities and making more efficient lifestyle choices?). The world’s most respected climate change economist Nicholas Stern confronted these new realities with urban experts and policymakers working across the globe.
Confronting Climate Change Panel
Left to right: Bruce Katz (Brookings), Nicholas Stern (Grantham Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, LSE), Karen Seto (Yale), Philipp Rode (LSE Cities), Tessa Jowell (LSE). © Catarina Heeckt

Programme:

Welcome
Ricky Burdett, Professor of Urban Studies and Director, LSE Cities/Urban Age, London School of Economics and Political Science

Speakers
Karen C. Seto, Associate Dean of Research; Director of Doctoral Studies; Professor of Geography and Urbanization Science, Yale University; Coordinating Lead Author for the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)
Nicholas Stern, IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government and Chairman of the Grantham Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics and Political Science, author of the Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change (2006)

Panel
Bruce Katz, Director of the Metropolitan Policy Program, and
Vice-President, Brookings Institution
Philipp Rode, Executive Director, LSE Cities/Urban Age and Senior Research Fellow, London School of Economics and Political Science

Chair
Tessa Jowell, former MP and UK Government Secretary of State, Professor in Practice, London School of Economics and Political Science

LSE Students

Further Information

Contact

Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft
Unter den Linden 13/15
10117 Berlin

 

T. +49 (0)30 3407 3401
info.ahg@db.com

Partners

Global Debates was jointly organised by the Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft and LSE Cities in association with Guardian Cities.

This event was one of five public Global Debates celebrating ten years of the Urban Age programme. The debates discussed five core themes that have been the focus of research and debate at the Urban Age since 2005.

Event Details

Thursday, 19/11/2015
Sheikh Zayed Lecture Theatre, LSE

Global Debates podcast link


Download
PDF Global Debates Matrix

Steering Urban Growth: can planning and architecture manage?

More urban areas will be constructed during the first three decades of this century than all of history, placing enormous pressure on politicians, planners and architects. If properly steered, urban growth can drive wealth creation through improved productivity, better planning and greater equity.

Alejandro Aravena (Elemental)
Alejandro Aravena (Elemental), by Catarina Heeckt
The reality of the urban condition, instead, reveals that in many parts of the world, urbanisation has become more spatially fragmented, less environmentally responsive and more socially divisive. Cities have become more sprawled and less dense. More urban areas will be constructed during first three decades of this century than all of history, placing enormous pressure on planners and architects. Do planners have the political mandate to steer urbanisation in a sustainable direction?
Urban Growth
Caracas, Venezuela, Image courtesy of U-TT at ETH Zürich
The head of UN Habitat Joan Clos, who is coordinating the world’s most influential urban policy convention Habitat III in 2016, exchanged global experiences with practicing architects, curators and researchers to identify whether the design and planning professions are up to the task of designing a new generation of cities that contribute to wealth creation and social equity.
Welcome Remarks, Ute Weiland, Deputy Director, Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft
Welcome Remarks, Ute Weiland, Deputy Director, Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft, by Catarina Heeckt

Programme

Welcome
Ute Weiland, Deputy Managing Director, Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft

Speakers
Joan Clos, Executive Director, UN Habitat, Secretary-General of the Habitat III Conference Alejandro Aravena, Founder Elemental, Santiago, Chile and Director, Venice Architecture Biennale, 2016

Panel
Beatrice Galilee, Daniel Brodsky Associate Curator of Architecture and Design, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Ricky Burdett, Professor of Urban Studies and Director, LSE Cities/Urban Age, London School of Economics and Political Science

Chair
José Castillo, Principal, Arquitectura 911sc, Mexico City and Visiting Professor Graduate School of Design, Harvard University

Left to right: Alejandro Aravena (Elemental), Beatrice Galilee (Metropolitan Museum of Art NY), Ricky Burdett (LSE Cities), Juan Clos (UN Habitat), Jose Castillo (Arquitectura 911sc)
Left to right: Alejandro Aravena (Elemental), Beatrice Galilee (Metropolitan Museum of Art NY), Ricky Burdett (LSE Cities), Juan Clos (UN Habitat), Jose Castillo (Arquitectura 911sc), by Catarina Heeckt

Further Information

Contact

Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft
Unter den Linden 13/15
10117 Berlin

 

T. +49 (0)30 3407 3401
info.ahg@db.com

Partners

Global Debates was jointly organised by the Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft and LSE Cities in association with Guardian Cities.

This event was one of five public Global Debates celebrating ten years of the Urban Age programme. The debates discussed five core themes that have been the focus of research and debate at the Urban Age since 2005.

Event Details

Monday, 23/11/2015
Sheikh Zayed Lecture Theatre, LSE

Global Debates podcast link

Download
PDF Global Debates Matrix

The Politics of Equity: who owns the city?

Since 2006, over 134 million hectares of African land – roughly the size of France, Spain and Germany – has been bought by foreign investors, the region where urban growth is most expected in the next 20 years. At the same time large swathes of global cities like London, New York and Paris are owned or being developed by foreign sovereign wealth funds and international corporate investors.
politics of equity
Luanda, Angola, by Paulo Moreira

Leading urban sociologist Saskia Sassen – who identified the global cities dynamic – argued that these new and tacit patterns of ownership are having a negative impact on the ‘cityness’, vibrancy and accessibility of urban systems by cutting off parts of the city from public use. Could this form of investment and speculation in cities and buildings be causing de-urbanisation? These issues were debated with policymakers and leaders who have been involved in reshaping the structure of urban ownership and investment.

From left to right: Anthony Williams (former Mayer Washington DC), Jose Castillo (Arquitectura 911sc) and other visitors
From left to right: Anthony Williams (former Mayer Washington DC), Jose Castillo (Arquitectura 911sc) and other visitors, by Catarina Heeckt
From left to right: Anthony Williams (former Mayer Washington DC), Saskia Sassen (Columbia University), Jose Castillo (Arquitectura 911sc), Craig Calhoun (LSE)
From left to right: Anthony Williams (former Mayer Washington DC), Saskia Sassen (Columbia University), Jose Castillo (Arquitectura 911sc), Craig Calhoun (LSE), by Catarina Heeckt

Programme

Speaker
Saskia Sassen, Robert S. Lynd Professor of Sociology,
Columbia University, author Global Cities and Expulsions

Panel
Jean-Louis Missika, Deputy Mayor of Paris in charge of urbanism, architecture, the projects of Greater Paris, economic development and attractiveness
Anthony Williams, Mayor of Washington DC 1999-2007, CEO and Executive Director, Federal City Council, Washington DC

Chair
Craig Calhoun, President and Director, London School of Economics and Political Science

Craig Calhoun (LSE)
Craig Calhoun (LSE), by Catarina Heeckt

Further Information

Contact

Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft
Unter den Linden 13/15
10117 Berlin

 

T. +49 (0)30 3407 3401
info.ahg@db.com

Partners

Global Debates was jointly organised by the Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft and LSE Cities in association with Guardian Cities.

This event was one of five public Global Debates celebrating ten years of the Urban Age programme. The debates discussed five core themes that have been the focus of research and debate at the Urban Age since 2005.

Event Details

Wednesday, 25/11/2015
Sheikh Zayed Lecture Theatre, LSE

Global Debates podcast link

Download
PDF Global Debates Matrix

Designing Urban Infrastructure: investing for now or tomorrow?

The OECD estimates that around US$ 53 trillion is required for investment in transport, energy efficiency, telecommunications, and water and waste infrastructure over the next 15 years. Yet, as the world rapidly urbanises, investment in urban infrastructure is lagging behind. Lack of vision, loss of nerve, absence of public funds and low levels of interest from investors all exacerbate this. Nonetheless some cities across the globe are demonstrating resilience and capacity for innovation.
Designing Urban Infrastructure
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, by Tuca Viera
While there is a consensus that investment in physical and social infrastructure can increase productivity, facilitate connection and promote social good, there are severe challenges and barriers to investment. Architect Norman Foster, who has been at the forefront of urban change in cities across the world, focused on the role that design can play in tackling social, economic and environmental futures, providing the context for the examination of the broader challenges of using infrastructure to help improve quality of life and the environment in cities in the UK and abroad.
Matussek Global Debates

 Welcome Remarks by Thomas Matussek of the Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft

AHG Advisory Board Members at Global Debates

Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft's Trustees at the Debate: Anne Ruth Herkes, Anna Katharina Herrhausen, Henrik Enderlein, Barbara Ischinger and Meera Shankar (left to right)

Programme

Welcome
Paul Achleitner, Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft

Speaker
Norman Foster, Chairman and Founder, Foster + Partners, Chairman, The Norman Foster Foundation

Panel
Andrew Adonis, Chairman, National Infrastructure Commission
Deyan Sudjic, Director, Design Museum, London

Chair
Ricky Burdett, Professor of Urban Studies and Director, LSE Cities/Urban Age, London School of Economics and Political Science

Debate Panel
Andrew Adonis, Chairman of the National Infrastructure Commission, Deyan Sudjic, Director of the Design Museum, London, and Ricky Burdett, Director of LSE Cities/Urban Age (left to right)

Further Information

Contact

Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft
Unter den Linden 13/15
10117 Berlin

 

T. +49 (0)30 3407 3401
info.ahg@db.com

Partners

Global Debates is jointly organised by the Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft and LSE Cities in association with Guardian Cities.

This event is one of the series of five public Global Debates celebrating ten years of the Urban Age programme. The debates discuss five core themes that have been the focus of research and debate at the Urban Age since 2005.

 

Event Details

Thursday, 26/11/2015
Sheikh Zayed Lecture Theatre, LSE

Global Debates podcast link

Download
PDF Global Debates Matrix

Narratives of Inclusion: can cities help us live together?

Cities like New York, Rio de Janeiro and Mumbai are booming. Things seem to be going well for these cities. But who exactly is it going well for?

Eminent urban sociologist Richard Sennett and author Suketu Mehta raised questions of identity, grounding and belonging in the contemporary city.
inclusion
São Paulo, Brazil, by Tuca Viera
By exploring the urban experiences and narratives of migrant communities and their inextricably linked connections with both their new and their home environment, this debate considered one of the greatest challenges for any city builder today: how do we form a community within these enormous, historically unprecedented, and continuously mobile agglomerations of people? Can we create cities and neighbourhoods which perhaps are not fully inclusive but at least are not exclusive to particular groups? How can we live better together in the 21st century city, these 10, 20, 60 million people living side-by-side, and on top of each other?
Suketu Mehta
Suketu Mehta, Professor of Journalism at the New York University, speaks about identity and belonging in big cities
panel global debate 5

 Left to right: Richard Sennett (LSE/NYU), Suketu Mehta (NYU) and Tessa Jowell (LSE)

Programme

Welcome
Thomas Matussek, Director, Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft

Speakers
Richard Sennett, Professor of Sociology, London School of Economics and Political Science and New York Universtiy, Chairman, Advisory Board, LSE Cities
Suketu Mehta, author The Maximum City, Associate Professor of Journalism, New York University

Chair
Tessa Jowell, former MP and UK Government Secretary of State, Professor in Practice, London School of Economics and Political Science

Global Debates Programmes

Further Information

Contact

Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft
Unter den Linden 13/15
10117 Berlin

 

T. +49 (0)30 3407 3401
info.ahg@db.com

Partners

Global Debates was jointly organised by the Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft and LSE Cities in association with Guardian Cities.

This event was one of five public Global Debates celebrating ten years of the Urban Age programme. The debates discussed five core themes that have been the focus of research and debate at the Urban Age since 2005.

Event Details

Thursday, 03/12/2015
Sheikh Zayed Lecture Theatre, LSE

Downloads
PDF Global Debates Matrix

10 years with impact:
Outcomes of the Urban Age programme

National presidents, prime ministers, state governors and city mayors, company executives and investors, police chiefs and transport commissioners, planners and architects have come to Urban Age conferences to meet, discuss and argue with some of the world’s most respected urban experts. They have learnt from each other about how cities can be better managed and designed at a time that the world’s population is more urbanised than ever before.
Pena Nieto

 Mexico's President (since 2012) and former Governor of Mexico State (2005 to 2011) Enrique Pena Nieto at the Urban Age conference in Mexico City in 2010.

A new bus rapid transit system in Johannesburg grew out of a presentation by the Mayor of Bogota at the Urban Age conference in South Africa. The new President of Mexico Enrique Pena Nieto realised how important it was to coordinate metropolitan and regional government at the Mexico City Urban Age event. Rahm Emanuel, the Mayor of Chicago, recognised that his economic policy was inspired by ideas generated at the Chicago Global Metro Summit. And, the German Chancellor Angela Merkel presented the Deutsche Bank Urban Age Award to a group of local slum-dwellers in Mumbai for their inspirational work on community toilet.
Richard Daley Chicago Metro Summit

 Richard Daley, Chicago's Mayor at the time, speaking at the Urban Age Global Metro Summit in Chicago in 2010.

At different scales and in different continents, the Urban Age has grown out of its initial shell as a conference amongst ‘urban nomads’ to become a fully-fledged agenda-setting circuit of international expertise on cities. Both established and cutting-edge, the Urban Age is now an authoritative voice on many urban fronts.
Merkel and Ackermann, Mumbai
Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel and Josef Ackermann, Chairman of the Management Board and the Group Executive Committee of Deutsche Bank at the time, at Urban Age in Mumbai 2007
To find out whether you are more likely to live to the age of 80 if you live in Hong Kong or Singapore, you can check the Urban Age Cities and Well-being Index. If you want to know whether it was Istanbul or Barcelona who has come out of the recession first, you can consult the Global Metro Monitor (developed in cooperation with the Brookings Institution). To be surprised that over 60% of Mumbaikers walk to work and 90% of workers in the City of London – including a few billionaires – take public transport, you can find the data that proves it on the Urban Age website. And, if you are interested in how efficient cities can be, you can look at the striking Urban Age ‘density pyramids’ seen by over 500,000 people at the Venice Biennale and the Tate Modern in London, confirming that Hong Kong is three times denser than mid-town Manhattan.
Urban Age Employment Density

 Urban Age's "density pyramids" compare the employment densities of London, New York and Hong Kong.

And finally, to find out what is the state-of-the-art of innovation on urban environmental policy, health and well-being practice, governance and planning, many of the leading practitioners and scholars meet regularly at Urban Age events across the world, go ahead and read our research reports and publications, and consult website and social media outlets.
Over ten years, the cooperation between Deutsche Bank’s Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft and the LSE has resulted in a highly recognised and respected institution that has spearheaded new thinking on cities at a time that it matters most – for all of us who are now living in an ‘urban age’.

Contact

Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft
Unter den Linden 13/15
10117 Berlin

 

T. +49 (0)30 3407 3401
info.ahg@db.com

Partner

Urban Age is a joint project of the Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft and LSE Cities.

For more information visit the
official Urban Age website.

Publications

Broadsheet Urban Age 10:
"Reflections on the Urban Age 2005-2015"
PDF download

Find all Urban Age publications in the overview of our publications.

Videos 19/11 - 03/12/2015
Global Debates

Global Debate 1: Confronting Climate Change: can cities be the solution?

Confronting Climate Change: can cities be the solution?

Video of the 1st Global Debate on 19 November 2015

Global Debate 2: Steering Urban Growth: can planning and architecture manage?

Steering Urban Growth: can planning and architecture manage?

Video of the 2nd Global Debate on 23 November 2015

Global Debate 3: The Politics of Equity: who owns the city?

The Politics of Equity: who owns the city?

Video of the 3rd Global Debate on 25 November 2015

Global Debate 4: Designing Urban Infrastructure: investing for now or tomorrow?

Designing Urban Infrastructure: investing for now or tomorrow?

Video of the 4th Global Debate on 26 November 2015

Global Debate 5: Narratives of Inclusion

Narratives of Inclusion: can cities help us live together?

Video of the 5th Global Debate on 03 Dezember 2015